Inside Unmanned Systems

AUG-SEP 2016

Inside Unmanned Systems provides actionable business intelligence to decision-makers and influencers operating within the global UAS community. Features include analysis of key technologies, policy/regulatory developments and new product design.

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41 unmanned systems inside August/September 2016 ugust/Septe August/September 2016 August/September 2016 be August/September 2016 0 August/September 2016 6 August/September 2016 ENGINEERING. PRACTICE. POLICY. BY THE NUMBERS 10.1 million The number of acres burned by wildfires in the U.S. in 2015, which was a record year for forest fires. Source: National Interagency Coordination Center (NICC) "MOST OF THE TIME you're either way high in an airplane, or you're on the ground looking up." David Price, manager of forest planning operations, Michigan Department of Natural Resources, on using drones to find insect infestations in treetops Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. This scattershot approach can work for some species of tree, like jack pine, especially if the seeds are cheap and can be blanketed across a piece of land. DroneSeed takes the opposite approach. The first step in the process uses a mapping and surveying UAS to locate the exact "micro site" in which a seedling will thrive. "We're not just randomly dropping seeds," Kozak said. DroneSeed eliminates areas too close to roads, waterways, other trees and buildings. "From there, we can take characteristics of the environment to find sites that are ideal for planting. If we just eliminated (from consider- ation a spot with) a large rock…we may deter- mine that shadows from that rock may create ideal conditions for a young tree to grow up, and choose to plant a seed there." After the mapping drone does its job, the service drone takes over. Armed with a pay- load of proprietary seed pellets—each a mix- ture of fertilizer, natural pest deterrents, and the seed—and a compressed air gun, the drone fires a pellet into the ground at 350 feet per

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