Inside Unmanned Systems

AUG-SEP 2016

Inside Unmanned Systems provides actionable business intelligence to decision-makers and influencers operating within the global UAS community. Features include analysis of key technologies, policy/regulatory developments and new product design.

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9 unmanned systems inside August/September 2016 ugust/Septe August/September 2016 August/September 2016 be August/September 2016 0 August/September 2016 6 August/September 2016 ENGINEERING. PRACTICE. POLICY. BY THE NUMBERS $ 10.9 billion The value of non-military UAS production by 2025 $ 2.6 million The value of non-military UAS production in 2016 15.4 percent The annual growth rate of that production, compounded annually. Source: 2016 World Civil UAS Market Profi le and Forecast, The Teal Group Corp., July 2016 INDUSTRY REACTS PART 107 T he wait is finally over. After years of wondering exactly what rules commercial drone operators will have to abide by, the industry finally got its answer. Released in June, the Part 107 rule applying to for-profit f lights with drones weighing 55 pounds or the Part 107 rule applying to for-profit f lights with drones weighing 55 pounds or less, including payload, takes effect in late August. The rules provide operators of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) with specific mandates while easing many of the restrictions that have made it difficult to operate UAS businesses in the U.S. Drone pilots won't need a pilot's license, they will be able to take a test for the necessary certification. The rules also make it easier to f ly. Not only will most operators not necessary certification. The rules also make it easier to f ly. Not only will most operators not need to obtain a Section 333 exemption, there'll be no need to go through the delay-prone and widely despised process to get a Certificate of Waiver or Authorization (COA) to f ly some and widely despised process to get a Certificate of Waiver or Authorization (COA) to f ly some specific missions. "We've been in limbo for a long time waiting for the rule," said Rose Mooney, executive director of the Mid-Atlantic Aviation Partnership at Virginia Tech, or MAAP. "The rule gives manufacturers and operators a path toward more extensive use, albeit limited to daylight op- erations and within visual line of sight. The new rule will open up opportunities in areas such as roof inspections, infrastructure inspections and real estate, allowing for business growth." Overall, manufacturers, users and other industry players see the rules, collectively called Part 107, as significant progress. "With part 107 we're able to take the infrastructure that we've been building of the f light "With part 107 we're able to take the infrastructure that we've been building of the f light service providers and data providers ad connect those into a network that easily enables data on demand on a much larger scale across the United States," said John Perry, the founder and CEO of Altavian. But there are many who would like to see more, especially when it comes to f lying beyond But there are many who would like to see more, especially when it comes to f lying beyond But there are many who would like to see more, especially when it comes to f lying beyond the visual line of sight of the pilot. Under Part 107 operators still need to apply for a Section by Renee Knight A look at what manufacturers, users and other experts think the new small UAS rules mean for this growing industry. THE TO

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