Inside Unmanned Systems

OCT-NOV 2016

Inside Unmanned Systems provides actionable business intelligence to decision-makers and influencers operating within the global UAS community. Features include analysis of key technologies, policy/regulatory developments and new product design.

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4 unmanned systems inside October/November 2016 EDITORIAL MISSION: Inside Unmanned Systems provides actionable business intelligence to decision-makers and influencers operating within the dynamic global UAS community. Analysis of key technologies, independent reports on the latest policy and regulatory developments, and evaluation of new product designs and applications support the results stakeholders need to succeed across the commercial, civil and defense sectors. PUBLISHED BY AUTONOMOUS MEDIA, LLC MANAGING DIRECTOR Richard Fischer richard@insideunmannedsystems.com 68 White Street Suite 7-321 Red Bank NJ 07701-1656 USA Telephone: 609-240-1590 Copyright 2016 Autonomous Media LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical (including by Internet, photocopy, recording, or information storage and retrieval), without permission in writing from Autonomous Media. Authorization is granted to photocopy items, with attribution, for internal/educational or personal non- commercial use. For all other uses, contact Richard Fischer. INSIDE UNMANNED SYSTEMS is a controlled circulation magazine, published 6 times a year. Postage paid at Lebanon Junction MPO, KY 40150-9998, Mail Permit #473. Publishing Team PUBLISHER Richard Fischer richard@insideunmannedsystems.com BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER Steve Copley steve@insideunmannedsystems.com EDITOR Dee Ann Divis deeann@insideunmannedsystems.com SENIOR EDITOR Renee Knight renee@insideunmannedsystems.com CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Charles Choi, Peter Gutierrez and Rachel Kaufman DIRECTOR of MARKETING Christine Waring christine@insideunmannedsystems.com WEBMASTER Richard Thomas CIRCULATION DIRECTOR Peggie Kegel EDITORIAL OPINION T he trajectory of the unmanned market needs have outpaced the policy and regulatory framework they've necessitated—until now. The FAR Part 107 now enable the conditional legal operation of unmanned aircraft systems. Many ar- gue the policymaking that is shaping the contours of this market are lagging the tempo and intensity of unmanned research, innovation and product development. There is an abundance of important work being accomplished by UAS—from inspecting rail infrastructure to ensure safe operations (page 10) to generating 3-D terrain surveys for automated machine guidance that build road systems to a high- er standard of quality and safety (page 30). UAS solutions now exist that were once deemed too large in scope, complexity or ambition to consider tackling—further, those solutions are increasingly being deployed for safety critical applications. That we are only at the early stages of this technology life cycle is an indica- tion of just how deeply and thoroughly unmanned systems will enable and disrupt. How they will encourage, require, perhaps even force—productivity, efficiency and safety in almost all application segments and adopter categories. We believe unmanned innovation is best studied through the lens of applications and real world use cases. Best practices and lessons learned from those areas of op- erations, and operators with the deepest well of knowledge and experience—weather it's the United States Air Force (USAF) or the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) or the many leading research institutions now partnering with industry and government and perhaps most importantly, the entrepreneurial class who are bringing unmanned ideas from engineered design to system reality. Talk about changing the world. However, technology and policy need to be well aligned to drive true innova- tion—such that policy has an uplifting effect on adoption and end user accep- tance; and reciprocally, technology conveying an ameliorative effect for conduct- ing safe and legal operations. FAR Part 107 is just one important waypoint as the conjoined technology and policy perspectives navigate a route to safe and effective UAS integration in the national airspace. and Policy Conjoining Technology DRONES SAVE TIME. DRONES SAVE MONEY. DRONES SAVE LIVES.

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