Inside Unmanned Systems

FEB-MAR 2017

Inside Unmanned Systems provides actionable business intelligence to decision-makers and influencers operating within the global UAS community. Features include analysis of key technologies, policy/regulatory developments and new product design.

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31 unmanned systems inside February/March 2017 ENGINEERING. PRACTICE. POLICY. we went in with our aircraft and said, 'What is that?' Maybe you missed something.'" Robinson is hoping software advancements will make it even easier to spot people based on what they're wearing. If searchers know the per- son is wearing blue jeans, for example, they can tell the software to find anything in the picture that's blue and a certain size, filtering out bigger objects like a lake. That capability isn't available yet, but Robinson said it won't be long until it is. … and Rescue When someone goes missing, chances are they might be hurt or dehydrated once rescuers find them. To help keep people alive until they can get to them, DEEMI also uses its drones to de- liver supplies, such as medication and blankets, with the with the STORK Payload Deploy Sys- tem for DJI Inspire 1. The drop-offs are timed, Bowie said, and can be performed over and over. "It's a couple of stainless steel fingers attached to landing gear. When the gear goes up, the fin- gers separate and we can drop things," Apple- bee said. "That's very important in a rescue situ- ation. Say somebody is stuck on a small island or maybe they capsized while white water rafting and are stuck on a rock without a life jacket. We can drop life jackets, water bottles, medical sup- plies and walkie talkies right into their hands." Delivering communication devices enables rescuers to talk to victims and find out how hurt they are and what supplies they might need, Boyer said. Adding a small speaker to a UAS could also help rescuers communicate with someone they haven't located yet, using it to ask the person to come out of the woods or to wave his hands to make him easier to spot. "FIRST RESPONDERS could see exactly what the drone saw." Dallas Griffin, managing member, Lone Star UAViators Delivering Aviation Approved GPS Solutions…Worldwide. www.aspennexnav.com Copyright 2017 Aspen Avionics Inc. "Aspen Avionics," "NexNav", "MAX," "Micro-i," and the Aspen Avionics aircraft logo are trademarks of Aspen Avionics Inc. All rights reserved. U.S. Patent No. 8,085,168, and additional patents pending. Approved NexNav ™ GPS solutions for the aerospace industry have a well-proven track record in civil and military, manned and unmanned applications. • GPS-SBAS circuit card assemblies and GPSSUs • Small size, lightweight and low power consumption • Approved for ADS-B OUT position source • Approved for enroute, terminal and approach GPS navigation • Products meet all expected GPS requirements for UAS BVLOS operations • Made in U.S.A. • Go to www.aspennexnav.com for more information Compact Size • Small size, lightweight and low power consumption • Approved for ADS-B OUT position source • Approved for enroute, terminal and approach GPS navigation • Products meet all expected GPS requirements for UAS BVLOS operations

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