Inside Unmanned Systems

JUN-JUL 2017

Inside Unmanned Systems provides actionable business intelligence to decision-makers and influencers operating within the global UAS community. Features include analysis of key technologies, policy/regulatory developments and new product design.

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15 unmanned systems inside June/July 2017 delivery routes. Then there's the tremendous variance in state drone laws. Texas only permits a handful of drone missions, out- lawing the rest. Mississippi allows any type of drone operation permitted by the FAA, but Alabama needed a 30-page document approved to deliver a football via drone at Auburn. Tough to set up a national drone business model if operators must deal with this kind of variance, eh? Faint Support Finally, a lack of support from the State and Commerce Departments. Until 2015 the State Department blocked nearly all American drone exports citing the 1987 Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR). No kidding, State claimed drones are cruise missiles in the MCTR and ap- plied a "strong presumption of denial" for export of drones. This cost General Atomics tens of millions of dollars to develop an ex- portable MQ-1 Predator while the Israelis, Europeans and Chinese sold competitive systems with fewer restrictions. State even managed to delay export of 3DR prosumer quadcopters by citing the MCTR. Not what you want your government doing when fac- ing a Chinese competitor that already con- trols the American prosumer drone market. The Commerce Department is giving the U.S. commercial drone industry support by benign neglect. It's not that they don't like our drone industry, it's just that they don't get as excited as they should when you can count large American commercial quad- copter manufacturers on one hand (maybe just one finger). Can you imagine what would happen if a foreign manufacturer took over 90% of the automobile market? Of course, none of this is irreversible. We know where the problems are and many of them are being addressed. The best thing our government can do is recognize our commercial drone industry for what it is— ping 200S is the world's smallest FCC approved ADS-B and Mode C/S Transponder. At 50 grams, it transmits at 250W above 500'AGL for full visibility by Air Traffic Control and manned aircraft. Aviation grade position integrity for unmanned systems has arrived. FYXnav is the world's smallest and lightest FAA TSO Certified GPS. FYXnav uses receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM) to detect errors, jamming and spoofing. Don't risk critical operations or your UAS investment on a smartphone GPS. At only 20 grams, ping 2020 (UAT) and ping 1090 (1090ES) ADS-B Transceivers increase airspace safety by broadcasting your UAS position via ADS-B to surrounding aircraft and ATC with a range of 30+ miles. A dual frequency ADS-B receiver and interface enable you to display nearby aircraft positions on your ground station for maximum situational awareness. ÒRadar Contact EstablishedÓ all products shown actual size uavionix.com Aviation grade position integrity for unmanned systems has arrived. is the world's smallest and lightest TSO Certified GPS. autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM) to detect errors, jamming and spoofing. Don't risk critical operations or your UAS investment on a smartphone GPS. the biggest change to hit aviation since the Wright Brothers, with cascading effects that will revolutionize our personal and com- mercial transportation industry. If we stop thinking "toy" and start thinking "Wright Flyer" things will start falling into place.

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