Inside Unmanned Systems

AUG-SEP 2017

Inside Unmanned Systems provides actionable business intelligence to decision-makers and influencers operating within the global UAS community. Features include analysis of key technologies, policy/regulatory developments and new product design.

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11 unmanned systems inside August/September 2017 ping 200S is the world's smallest FCC approved ADS-B and Mode C/S Transponder. At 50 grams, it transmits at 250W above 500'AGL for full visibility by Air Traffic Control and manned aircraft. Aviation grade position integrity for unmanned systems has arrived. FYXnav is the world's smallest and lightest FAA TSO Certified GPS. FYXnav uses receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM) to detect errors, jamming and spoofing. Don't risk critical operations or your UAS investment on a smartphone GPS. At only 20 grams, ping 2020 (UAT) and ping 1090 (1090ES) ADS-B Transceivers increase airspace safety by broadcasting your UAS position via ADS-B to surrounding aircraft and ATC with a range of 30+ miles. A dual frequency ADS-B receiver and interface enable you to display nearby aircraft positions on your ground station for maximum situational awareness. ÒRadar Contact EstablishedÓ all products shown actual size uavionix.com Aviation grade position integrity for unmanned systems has arrived. is the world's smallest and lightest TSO Certified GPS. autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM) to detect errors, jamming and spoofing. Don't risk critical operations or your UAS investment on a smartphone GPS. to make it safe and airworthy. The Air Force has already addressed this problem with Universal Control Interface (UCI) stan- dards. UCI only addresses data needed for drones to plan their missions, interact with air traffic control and process data. Actual f light control is handled by airframe spe- cific flight software. Where the Market is Going Is there any current evidence of market consolidation? I think we already have our "Apple approach" with the People's Republic of China's (PRC) DJI. DJI is dominating the A mer ican consumer drone market with its tightly coupled hardware/OS approach. Their Phantom line is close to being the country's uni- versal small drone. Finding the "Android approach" takes more digging, but I think Insitu is on the right track—albeit for larger drones. Their Insitu Common Open Mission Management Command and Control (ICOMC2) software takes the UCI approach by strictly separating f light control software from mission software to maintain airworthiness while encourag- ing innovation via published interfaces for the mission software. The manufacturer is responsible for supplying the f light control software for their airframe, but the mis- sion application software is open to any- one. Although it doesn't have the market dominance of DJI's Phantom, Insitu's Scan Eagle is a proven, airworthy drone "truck" with a substantial market share of the larg- er drone market. Will the unique aspects of aviation drive an Apple solution or will the open Android approach win out, just like it did with smart phones? Only time will tell… Right: It took General Atomics years and tens of millions of dollars to make Predator compliant NATO airworthiness standards.

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