Inside Unmanned Systems

OCT-NOV 2017

Inside Unmanned Systems provides actionable business intelligence to decision-makers and influencers operating within the global UAS community. Features include analysis of key technologies, policy/regulatory developments and new product design.

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11 unmanned systems inside October/November 2017 ping 200S is the world's smallest FCC approved ADS-B and Mode C/S Transponder. At 50 grams, it transmits at 250W above 500'AGL for full visibility by Air Traffic Control and manned aircraft. Aviation grade position integrity for unmanned systems has arrived. FYXnav is the world's smallest and lightest FAA TSO Certified GPS. FYXnav uses receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM) to detect errors, jamming and spoofing. Don't risk critical operations or your UAS investment on a smartphone GPS. At only 20 grams, ping 2020 (UAT) and ping 1090 (1090ES) ADS-B Transceivers increase airspace safety by broadcasting your UAS position via ADS-B to surrounding aircraft and ATC with a range of 30+ miles. A dual frequency ADS-B receiver and interface enable you to display nearby aircraft positions on your ground station for maximum situational awareness. ÒRadar Contact EstablishedÓ all products shown actual size uavionix.com Aviation grade position integrity for unmanned systems has arrived. is the world's smallest and lightest TSO Certified GPS. autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM) to detect errors, jamming and spoofing. Don't risk critical operations or your UAS investment on a smartphone GPS. sumer drone market. The CEO of one of my absolute favorite small defense UAS companies, John Perry at Altavian, put it this way: "There's been no point to us get- ting into the commercial UAS market for small quadcopters. DJI had it tied up with their prosumer offerings, but the DJI ban is a game-changer. While the ban is only for the DoD, it signals that security-con- scious users in government and enterprise need an alternative for short-range drones that offer information assurance at a lower price point." AeroVironment is also consid- ering a move into small commercial UAS now that a way forward is emerging. The awakening American giant in this market is Intel. Intel originally seemed just interested in drones as a chip market for the RealSense 3D vision chips. Loosely based on the technology behind the Kinect Xbox controller, RealSense enables drones to detect and avoid objects autonomously. Intel's experience with drones convinced them they had almost as much potential as the smart phone market. Because Intel regretted not manufacturing their own smart phone as competitors Microsoft and Apple did, they became determined not to miss out on the commercial drone market. Enter Intel's amazing autonomy dem- onstration at InterDrone 2017. Intel CEO Brian Krzanich led the demonstration of the Intel Falcon™ 8+ system as it first used its Intel RealSense technology to au- tonomously navigate obstacles and then its stereo cameras to render a perfect 3-D model of a mock up apartment building showing automatic change detection with the new Intel Insight Platform. Although the drone is manufactured by a German subsidiary, the chips inside are American built. Intel is also committed to building commercial drones of their own design. The Defense Bigs could probably pull off designing a Star Wars fighter if properly motivated. Intel could build the Death Star itself—with Intel in- side and without breaking a sweat. As much as this Air Force vet hates to admit it, the Army got this right. And the drone war balance of pow- er just may be shifting to our side of the Pacific .

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