Inside Unmanned Systems

OCT-NOV 2017

Inside Unmanned Systems provides actionable business intelligence to decision-makers and influencers operating within the global UAS community. Features include analysis of key technologies, policy/regulatory developments and new product design.

Issue link: http://insideunmanned.epubxp.com/i/888912

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 30 of 75

31 unmanned systems inside October/November 2017 ENGINEERING. PRACTICE. POLICY. to see a little better coordination with the emergency operations centers. The FAA did a great job setting up the necessary layers to quickly get approv- als so UAS pilots could f ly, but it took some time for first responders to deter- mine where they actually needed help, and to then pass that information on to the drone operators. The personnel in the emergency operations centers are stressed and exhausted, working long hours and making difficult decisions, Hendrix said, and many of them don't know a lot about UAS and what they can do. Many county judges, who are respon- sible for asking the state to set up TFRs in Texas, didn't even really know what a TFR was or why they might need it. Educating first responders about UAS and how to integrate them into emergency response will help with di- saster responses in the future, and is something Hendrix and his team plan to focus on. Synchronizing the center's needs with the capability of the air- craft and the pilots would also make a huge difference. If operators without the right qualifications come to help, officials can tell them they already have someone on the job, reducing the Dr. Michael Starek and his team at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi deploy UAS to monitor the effects of Harvey on coastal marshes. To read more about their efforts, read Drones Monitor Coastal Marshes After Harvey at insideunmannedsystems.com. „ confusion and the number of novices f lying in already crowded airspace. Once they have a chance to decom- press, operators will look at how the mis- sions went after both Harvey and Irma and take lessons learned into the next disaster response. Those who were part of the recovery efforts are certain drones will continue to play a huge role in these types of missions, with even more ap- plications and benefits to come in the future. Drones also will continue to help the communities impacted by these lat- est storms as they focus on rebuilding. "We just hope everybody continues on the path to recovery as fast as possi- ble," Hendrix said. "We're here to help. We're part of rebuilding Texas, we'll be here until it gets rebuilt." Delivering Aviation Approved GPS Solutions…Worldwide. www.aspennexnav.com Copyright 2017 Aspen Avionics Inc. "Aspen Avionics," "NexNav", "MAX," "Micro-i," and the Aspen Avionics aircraft logo are trademarks of Aspen Avionics Inc. All rights reserved. U.S. Patent No. 8,085,168, and additional patents pending. Approved NexNav ™ GPS solutions for the aerospace industry have a well-proven track record in civil and military, manned and unmanned applications. • GPS-SBAS circuit card assemblies and GPSSUs • Small size, lightweight and low power consumption • Approved for ADS-B OUT position source • Approved for enroute, terminal and approach GPS navigation • Products meet all expected GPS requirements for UAS BVLOS operations • Made in U.S.A. • Go to www.aspennexnav.com for more information Compact Size • Small size, lightweight and low power consumption • Approved for ADS-B OUT position source • Approved for enroute, terminal and approach GPS navigation • Products meet all expected GPS requirements for UAS BVLOS operations AFTER THE STORM

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of Inside Unmanned Systems - OCT-NOV 2017