Inside Unmanned Systems

OCT-NOV 2017

Inside Unmanned Systems provides actionable business intelligence to decision-makers and influencers operating within the global UAS community. Features include analysis of key technologies, policy/regulatory developments and new product design.

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The driver (human) controls everything: steering, brakes, throttle, power Most functions are still controlled by a driver, but some (like braking) can be done automatically by the car At least 2 functions are automated (like cruise control & lane-centering), but the driver must be ready to take control of the vehicle Drivers are still necessary, but are not required to monitor the situation as with previous levels Vehicles perform all safety- critical driving functions and monitor roadway conditions for an entire trip, with option for human driving No option for human driving— no steering wheel or controls 66 unmanned systems inside October/November 2017 Full Autonomy (+Human) Having "no option to drive" is one of the top deterrents "Having the option to drive myself" is a main attractor Partial Autonomy Not being able to "fully relax" is a top deterrent Full Autonomy (No Human) Institute of Technolog y found that drivers across all age groups wanted some of the ad- vantages of automation while keeping a per- son in the loop for safety reasons and for the sheer fun of driving. Eighty percent of the nearly 2,300 peo- ple surveyed online for KBB's 2016 Future Autonomous Vehicle Driver Study agreed: WASHINGTON VIEW by DEE ANN DIVIS "people should always have the option to drive themselves." While a third said fully driverless cars were appropriate for seniors and a major- ity (59 percent) believed them to be the right choice for those who drink, a third said they would never buy a Level 5 car and 35 percent said they would wait until they were more com- fortable with full automation. Charts courtesy of Kelly Blue Book. THE LEVELS OF AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES LEVEL 4 AUTONOMY (+HUMAN) Autonomous Vehicles "Tipping Point" Transition from human drivers to vehicles driving Our World Today Near to Distant Future http://www.techrepublic.com/article/autonomous-driving-levels-0-to-5-understanding-the-diff erences/ hits the "sweet spot" by providing all the benefi ts of vehicle autonomy without stripping away driver control " It gives me the option to drive or not drive. There are times that it is fun to drive a car—out in the country where you can stop or slow down to look at things. But for a long trip, the full autonomy would be great." " Because even though it is chiefl y autonomous it still is equipped with seating, a steering wheel and brakes so that a human can take over if needed. Machines are not 100% reliable and we need the human element to fall back on." " It seems to off er the best rounded experience—allows people to not have to drive if they don't want to/ can't for any reason (age, sickness, just don't feel like it, unfamiliar area, etc.), yet allows for one to drive if needed or desired." HUMAN ONLY MODERN VEHICLE MODERN PLUS PARTIAL AUTONOMY FULL AUTONOMY (+ HUMAN) FULL AUTONOMY (NO HUMAN) At least 2 functions are automated (like cruise control and lane-centering), but the driver must be ready to take control of the vehicle Drivers are still necessary, but are not required to monitor the situation as with previous levels Vehicles perform all safety- critical driving functions and monitor roadway conditions for an entire trip, with option for human driving No option for human driving— no steering wheel or controls Most functions are still controlled by a driver, but some (like braking) can be done automatically by the car Most functions are still controlled by a driver, but some (like braking) can be done automatically by the car

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