Inside Unmanned Systems

AUG-SEP 2018

Inside Unmanned Systems provides actionable business intelligence to decision-makers and influencers operating within the global UAS community. Features include analysis of key technologies, policy/regulatory developments and new product design.

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39 unmanned systems inside ENGINEERING. PRACTICE. POLICY. August/September 2018 ramp would, to allow for passage in a safe and efficient way." Among the other drone applica- tions the Memphis team would like to pursue are building inspection, wa- ter sampling, automated river moni- toring, fast-f irst-look capability for emergency response, medical device delivery, emergency communications via drone hubs, precision agriculture and wildlife counts. Brockman said the FAA agreed to let his team support some of these second- ary applications by bringing elements of their testing into the expedited IPP work underway for the top four tasks— if that additional testing was relevant to the priority work. The FAA also said it would 'absolutely' support a broader effort once Memphis had progressed sufficiently on its four primary focus areas. "The de-scoping is not going to im- pede any one of our missions from be- ing f lown," Brockman said. "What it will do is change the timing of them." Timing is perhaps less of an issue for Brockman, a self-described avia- tion geek, who has a vision for evolv- ing Memphis International into a hub for unmanned innovation, service and manufacturing. He sees a day when an airport-based f leet of driverless cars drop off and pickup passengers and automated air taxis move people from the surrounding area to the airport and back. "My excitement my passion, all of what I expressed initially on this—why we want to be in this program—has not changed a bit," Brockman told Inside Unmanned Systems. "…I'm no less in- vigorated today than I was. We've just got to do it in a little different way." It's just a matter of you flying as needed. And you then do the post-processing and immediately can tell from that, 'Oh, well, here are all the tugs. I need a tug. Here's the closest one. Let me go get it.'" Karim Tadros, director business development and product management, Intel " Delivering Aviation Approved GPS Solutions…Worldwide. www.aspennexnav.com Copyright 2018 Aspen Avionics Inc. "Aspen Avionics," "NexNav", "MAX," "Micro-i," and the Aspen Avionics aircraft logo are trademarks of Aspen Avionics Inc. All rights reserved. U.S. Patent No. 8,085,168, and additional patents pending. Approved NexNav ™ GPS solutions for the aerospace industry have a well-proven track record in civil and military, manned and unmanned applications. • GPS-SBAS circuit card assemblies and GPSSUs • Small size, lightweight and low power consumption • Approved for ADS-B OUT position source • Approved for enroute, terminal and approach GPS navigation • Products meet all expected GPS requirements for UAS BVLOS operations • Made in U.S.A. • Go to www.aspennexnav.com for more information Compact Size • Small size, lightweight and low power consumption • Approved for ADS-B OUT position source • Approved for enroute, terminal and approach GPS navigation • Products meet all expected GPS requirements for UAS BVLOS operations

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