Inside Unmanned Systems

DEC 2018 - JAN 2019

Inside Unmanned Systems provides actionable business intelligence to decision-makers and influencers operating within the global UAS community. Features include analysis of key technologies, policy/regulatory developments and new product design.

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ENGINEERING. PRACTICE. POLICY. 57 December 2018/January 2019  unmanned systems inside "The last thing you want is someone who pushes the envelope on safety and you end up with an injury or damaged infrastructure," he said. "I've seen it happen in the industry before because folks are desperate to get a job done. What you're looking for is a vendor who doesn't just deliver the data product, but who can do so in such a way that doesn't introduce unnecessary risk." GET GUIDANCE While drones can bring a variety of benefits to business operations, the thought of developing a program or even f inding the right service pro- vider can be overwhelming, especially for companies with no aviation back- ground. Industr y consultants can provide guidance and share their ex- pertise, making the process a little less painful and the result more rewarding. "There's definitely a state of confu- sion when companies are starting out," Speicher said. "They have to think about insurance, hardware and pay- loads and they're just overwhelmed. It takes time. People try to patch together a program that isn't fully baked and they end up having to circle back a lot and repeat some of the work. There's a process to getting a program set up. A lot of clients only have five hours a week to commit to the drone program and just haven't thought it through. This is a whole different department in the company that needs to have people dedicated to it." THE FUTURE As the industry evolves, more compa- nies are turning to a hybrid solution, which Hine expects to continue in the future. The equipment will become more sophisticated and easier to use, easing the training burden so more companies can turn to in-house pilots as part of the program. "If you have a guy monitoring a pipeline, he can use a drone to look out ahead of himself a mile or more, but the same guy probably won't do an in-depth inspection of a pipeline with that drone," Hine said. "Most Fortune 500 companies will have a mix of full-time pilots and contrac- tors. Finding the right balance is critical." Delivering Aviation Approved GPS Solutions…Worldwide. www.aspennexnav.com Copyright 2018 Aspen Avionics Inc. "Aspen Avionics," "NexNav", "MAX," "Micro-i," and the Aspen Avionics aircraft logo are trademarks of Aspen Avionics Inc. All rights reserved. U.S. Patent No. 8,085,168, and additional patents pending. Approved NexNav ™ GPS solutions for the aerospace industry have a well-proven track record in civil and military, manned and unmanned applications. • GPS-SBAS circuit card assemblies and GPSSUs • Small size, lightweight and low power consumption • Approved for ADS-B OUT position source • Approved for enroute, terminal and approach GPS navigation • Products meet all expected GPS requirements for UAS BVLOS operations • Made in U.S.A. • Go to www.aspennexnav.com for more information Compact Size • Small size, lightweight and low power consumption • Approved for ADS-B OUT position source • Approved for enroute, terminal and approach GPS navigation • Products meet all expected GPS requirements for UAS BVLOS operations

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