Inside Unmanned Systems

JUN-JUL 2019

Inside Unmanned Systems provides actionable business intelligence to decision-makers and influencers operating within the global UAS community. Features include analysis of key technologies, policy/regulatory developments and new product design.

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34 www.insideunmannedsystems.com  June/July 2019 unmanned systems inside Spreading the word about autonomous crash protection. The attenuator, in full display. PROJECT WATCH Innovative Worldwide UAS Use a Colorado-administered pooled fund program to study ATMA use over the next three years. Caltrans is scheduled to deploy a system this summer, and Factor hopes England will approve a national rollout by year's end. While Colorado is working with new vehicles, Missouri chose to send two trucks to Florida for retrofitting. "We've had several employees who've actually been hit twice" driving an attenuator, said Chris Redline, district engineer for Missouri's MoDOT Northwest region, via a video. One hundred in-state work zone crashes in four years, increas- ing traffic and distracted/aggressive drivers led Redline to seek an unmanned solution. "It's a very odd feeling looking into that rear-view mirror, and you see a truck or a car bar- relin' down on you. …It's real spooky out there." Redline put his two-truck retrofit cost at $549,000, with federal funds assisting the upgrade. A pilot program is now operating in Kansas City, with statewide rollout pending legislative approval. "It's the right thing to do," Redline said. "The technology is there." "It's a very odd feeling looking into that rear-view mirror, and you see a truck or a car barrelin' down on you. …It's real spooky out there." Chris Redline, district engineer for Missouri's MoDOT Northwest region Continuous improvement based on user feedback is envisioned: more robust communications and GUI; encr y ption and frequency hopping; added redun- dancy; optical detection; tuned-up nav igation and communications. The goal, per Factor: "To eliminate single-point failure." Last June, Kratos representatives testified at a trans- portation committee of the Pennsylvania Senate, argu- ing alongside Penn DOT in favor of ATMA deployment. They were joined by a TMA truck accident survivor. The motion passed both houses unanimously and the gov- ernor signed it. "This is a technology that is used in a very controlled environment," Factor noted. "It has all kinds of warnings, signs, lights. For that reason, it's very acceptable by the general public. "Everything about Kratos is about improving the enve- lope for the warfighter," he concluded. "But the company can pivot, and improve the lives of workers." The operator control unit calibrates positioning and direction for maximum eff ectiveness. Project Watch DEFENSE COMMERCIAL NEXUS

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